Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive at Local Post Offices

The National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) will conduct its 27th annual national food drive on Saturday, May 11. The Stamp Out Hunger® Food Drive, the country’s largest single-day food collection event, provides residents with an easy way to donate food to those in need in the community.

Customers simply leave their donation of non-perishable goods next to their mailbox before the delivery of the mail on Saturday, May 11. Letter carriers will collect these food donations on that day as they deliver mail along their postal routes. In Middle and West Tennessee, the donated food will be distributed to Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee and its network of Partner Agencies throughout 46-counties, ensuring that all donated food remains in the county in which it is donated.

People are encouraged to leave a sturdy bag – paper or plastic – containing non-perishable foods such as peanut butter, canned chicken or tuna and canned fruits or vegetables. Interested individuals can contact their local post office for participation information.

Commencement Events at the University of the South

The University of the South’s 2018-19 academic year comes to a close May 10, 11, and 12. A Convocation and Conferring of Degrees for the School of Theology will be held Friday, May 10; the University Baccalaureate on Saturday, May 11; and a Convocation for Conferring of Degrees for the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Letters on Sunday, May 12. All the ceremonies will be held in All Saints’ Chapel beginning at 10 a.m. and will be live-streamed for those unable to attend.

The School of Theology will confer four honorary degrees during the May 10 convocation. The Rt. Rev. Carl Walter Wright, bishop suffragan for Armed Forces and Federal Ministries of the Episcopal Church will receive an honorary degree and will preach during the service. This year’s other School of Theology honorary degree recipients are the Rev. Canon Gideon Byamugisha, the Rt. Rev. Maria Griselda Delgado, and the Rev. Canon George Frederick Dettwiller II.

During the Baccalaureate service Saturday, May 11, Roger W. Ferguson Jr., president and chief executive officer of TIAA and former vice chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve Board of Governors; R.F. “Roy” Foster, emeritus professor of Irish history at Oxford and professor of Irish history and literature at Queen Mary University of London; 25-year veteran of America’s space missions Matthew Golombek, a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Sherry Magill, former president and executive director of the Jessie Ball duPont Fund; and Dr. John R. Seffrin, former chief executive of the American Cancer Society, will receive honorary degrees. Seffrin will give the Baccalaureate address. 

On Sunday, May 12, a Convocation for Conferring of Degrees will be held at 10 a.m. in All Saints’ Chapel and on the Quad for the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Letters (tickets required). More than 400 students will graduate from the College, and 16 will receive master’s degrees from the School of Letters. A luncheon honoring the Class of 2019 graduates will follow.

Community Project to Preserve Sewanee’s Black History

This summer the Sewanee Black History Initiative is inviting all persons with roots in Sewanee’s black neighborhoods to participate in our community’s first-ever digitization fairs, which will be devoted to recovering, recording, and preserving the history of African-Americans on the Mountain. The fairs will be held on Memorial Day (Monday, May 27) and Friday, July 5, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days, at the St. Mark’s Community Center on Alabama Avenue in Sewanee.

Digitization fairs offer several ways to preserve the historical record in digital form. We invite all persons with roots in Sewanee’s black community to bring with them their memories, stories, and personal keepsakes—photographs, scrapbooks, postcards and letters, family Bibles, school records and yearbooks, trophies and diplomas—anything that reflects life in Sewanee in years past.

A team of present and former residents, university students, and staff will use scanners and cameras to make digital copies of their collections. Participants will not lose possession of their personal keepsakes. In fact, they get to keep their original materials and receive a free digital copy of them on a USB drive, which will be theirs to share with anyone they wish.

There will also be an oral history booth where participants can share their Sewanee stories about their grandparents, parents, siblings, and others and preserve those stories for generations to come. The Initiative team members will lead walks through the St. Mark’s neighborhood and lunch will be served to all participants.

Finally, participants also can ensure that future generations will remember Sewanee’s African-American history by donating a digital copy of their historic memorabilia to a new community digital archive dedicated to collecting, preserving, and honoring the history of the African-Americans who helped to make Sewanee a thriving and prosperous community.

For many generations the black residents of the Mountain were centrally important members of this community. They worked in the buildings of the University of the South and its academy, cooked meals for its students, and kept the homes and children of the town’s white residents. African-Americans built strong, family-centered neighborhoods and supported their own church and school. The African-American population in Sewanee once numbered in the hundreds. Sewanee—the university and the town—thrived because of their contributions. But today, as older residents have passed and younger generations have left for opportunities elsewhere, many fewer African-Americans live on the Mountain. The school, church, and many of their homes have been bulldozed. As a result, the record and memory of their lives and experiences and of how they helped shape the University and the community surrounding it are in danger of disappearing.

The members of the group organizing the events are: Shirley Taylor (Sewanee), James “Jimmy” Staten (Belvidere), Carl Hill (McMinnville), Sandra Davis Turner (Sewanee), Elmore Torbert, Jr. (Tullahoma), Jackie Duncan (Tullahoma), Doug Cameron (Sewanee), Tanner Potts (Sewanee), Robert Lamborn (Sewanee), Hannah Pommersheim (Sewanee), Nicky Hamilton (Sewanee), Sarah Sherwood (Sewanee), and Woody Register (Sewanee).

The Sewanee Black History events are sponsored by the Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation, a program launched by the University of the South to study and make known its historic entanglements with slavery and slavery’s legacies. The digitization fairs are made possible by a Common Heritage grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional support comes from the university’s Gerald Smith Experiential Learning Fund and the McCrickard Faculty Development Fund.

For more information, a Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SewaneeBlackHistory/ describes the activities. Community members can reach the Initiative by email sewaneeblackhistory@gmail.com or by phone (931) 598-1085.

Gardeners’ Market Opens May 25

The Sewanee Gardeners’ Market, open every Saturday morning, 8–10 a.m., in the summer, will have its opening day Saturday, May 25. The Market is located on Highway 41A, next to Hawkins Lane and the Mountain Goat Trail. 

Locally grown vegetables,flowers, plants, homemade items and meat are available from area folks. 

Sparkle Week

Sparkle Week is spring cleaning for residents inside the Monteagle city limits. Deadline is May 12. All items/trash/debris should by placed on the side of the road by this deadline so city workers can pick it up. Please, no tires or batteries.

Hospitality Shop Sale

The Hospitality Shop is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is located at 1096 University Ave. The shop is currently having a huge half-price sale with almost every item in the store at half the marked price. The Shop will close at 1 p.m., Saturday, May 11 and will reopen May 28 with summer inventory and other surprises.

Commencement Weekend Events and Honorees at the University of the South

 

The University of the South’s 2018-19 academic year comes to a close May 10, 11, and 12. A Convocation and Conferring of Degrees for the School of Theology will be held Friday, May 10; the University Baccalaureate on Saturday, May 11; and a Convocation for Conferring of Degrees for the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Letters on Sunday, May 12. All the ceremonies will be held in All Saints’ Chapel beginning at 10 a.m. and will be live-streamed for those unable to attend.

Honorary degrees will be presented during the School of Theology Commencement and during the Baccalaureate service.

The School of Theology will confer four honorary degrees during the May 10 convocation. The Rt. Rev. Carl Walter Wright, bishop suffragan for Armed Forces and Federal Ministries of the Episcopal Church will receive an honorary degree and will preach during the service. This year’s other School of Theology honorary degree recipients are the Rev. Canon Gideon Byamugisha, the Rt. Rev. Maria Griselda Delgado, and the Rev. Canon George Frederick Dettwiller II.

During the Baccalaureate service Saturday, May 11, Roger W. Ferguson Jr., president and chief executive officer of TIAA and former vice chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve Board of Governors; R.F. “Roy” Foster, emeritus professor of Irish history at Oxford and professor of Irish history and literature at Queen Mary University of London; 25-year veteran of America’s space missions Matthew Golombek, a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Sherry Magill, former president and executive director of the Jessie Ball duPont Fund; and Dr. John R. Seffrin, former chief executive of the American Cancer Society, will receive honorary degrees. Seffrin will give the Baccalaureate address. More information about each recipient follows.

On Sunday, May 12, a Convocation for Conferring of Degrees will be held at 10 a.m. in All Saints’ Chapel and on the Quad for the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Letters (tickets required). More than 400 students will graduate from the College, and 16 will receive master’s degrees from the School of Letters. A luncheon honoring the Class of 2019 graduates will follow.

Roger W. Ferguson Jr., is president and chief executive officer of TIAA, a leading provider of retirement services. He is the former vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve System. As the only governor in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 11, 2001, he led the Fed’s initial response to the terrorist attacks, taking actions that kept the U.S. financial system functioning while reassuring the global financial community. He served on President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness as well as its predecessor, the Economic Recovery Advisory Board.

R.F. “Roy” Foster is emeritus professor of Irish history at Oxford and professor of Irish history and literature at Queen Mary University of London. In 1991 he became the first Carroll Professor of Irish History at Oxford and a fellow of Hertford College. He is a fellow of the British Academy, a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. His award-winning books include The Irish Story: Telling Tales and Making It Up in Ireland; a biography of W.B. Yeats; and Vivid Faces: The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland 1890-1922.

Matthew Golombek is a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory—NASA’s center for planetary exploration—and a 25-year veteran of America’s space missions to Mars. He is the project scientist of the Mars Exploration Rover mission, concluded in February 2019, and he led the landing site selection efforts for the InSight lander that touched down last November. His research focuses on Mars geology and the prediction of surface characteristics. He was the chief scientist for the Mars Pathfinder Mission, which successfully landed a spacecraft and rover on Mars in 1997.

Sherry Magill served from 1993 to 2018 as president and executive director of the Jessie Ball duPont Fund, a grant-making foundation in Jacksonville, Fla. While there, she spearheaded development of the Jessie Ball duPont Center, a nonprofit and philanthropic center. Prior to joining the Fund in 1991, Dr. Magill served as vice president at Washington College, a private liberal arts college in Maryland, where she also taught courses in American Studies. She has served as a senior moderator for the Aspen Institute and as chair of the Council on Foundations board, and is the founding executive director of the Wye Faculty Seminar, an enrichment program for professors at small colleges.

Dr. John R. Seffrin served as chief executive of the American Cancer Society from 1992 to 2015; he also led the Society’s nonpartisan advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. Seffrin has served as professor of practice at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. Among his many appointments, he served on the White House Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; was appointed to the National Cancer Policy Board; and led the creation of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Bob Corker at Sewanee, April 24

Retired Senator Bob Corker will be interviewed on the Sewanee campus by noted journalist Olivier Knox; a Q&A period will follow the interview. The event will be held at noon, Wednesday, April 24, in Guerry Auditorium. The public is welcome.

Bob Corker left office in January after serving two terms in the U.S. Senate. As a senator, he was known especially for demonstrating bipartisanship and for his service as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where he pushed to hold foreign governments accountable for adverse actions. In his first term, Corker worked on the 2008 financial crisis and auto bailout. He was a vocal lawmaker advocating for the end of human trafficking and slavery.

Corker’s business background is in construction and real estate. He served as Commissioner of Finance and Administration for the State of Tennessee from 1995 to 1996, and was elected mayor of Chattanooga in 2000, serving one term (2001–05).

Olivier Knox is chief Washington correspondent for SiriusXM radio, covering the White House, politics, and foreign policy, and currently serves as president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. At SiriusXM, Knox provides commentary for the broadcaster’s political channels, where he also hosts a weeknight show. He joined SiriusXM in 2018 from Yahoo News, which he joined following 15 years of reporting for Agence France-Presse. Knox covered the George W. Bush administration, the impeachment and acquittal of President Bill Clinton, and the 2000 election. He has a bachelor’s degree from Columbia and a master’s from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Upcycled Fashion Show

Sustain Sewanee and the Sewanee Theater Department proudly present the third annual Upcycled Fashion Show. The show will feature outfits from the Hospitality Shop, styled and designed by students. Come on out for a night of fashion and fun at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 25, at the Tennessee Williams Center. All pieces in the show will be available for purchase at the conclusion of the show to benefit the Hospitality Shop. Everyone is invited to attend.

Scholarship Sewanee to Be Held April 25 and 26

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Scholarship Sewanee, the university’s annual celebration of student scholarship, research, and creativity. The event begins with a talk Thursday afternoon, April 25, and continues through Friday, April 26.

Scholarship Sewanee 2019 will feature 105 posters and 53 oral presentations representing biology, physics, chemistry, earth and environmental systems, psychology, politics, economics, English, history, visual arts, and more. Breakout sessions will run from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 26, and the poster session in Spencer Hall will last from 2:30 to 5 p.m. Two noted speakers will give talks, and other campus events during the week are related to student scholarship and creative endeavors. (Scholarship Sewanee has grown dramatically from its early days as “Scientific Sewanee,” a half-day poster session with approximately 40 posters affiliated with the sciences!)

The community is invited to join in this celebration of scholarship. The complete schedule may be found at http://www.sewanee.edu/academics/research/undergraduate-research/scholarship-sewanee/.

Erika Milam, the Scholarship Sewanee 25th anniversary speaker, will discuss “The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America,” an examination of the role of violence and war in the human species at 4:30 p.m., Thursday, April 25, in Gailor Auditorium. Milam, a professor of history at Princeton University, specializes in the history of the modern life sciences, including the ways in which scientists have used animals as models for human behavior. Her new book, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America, charts the controversy over instinctual aggression in defining human nature in the 1960s and ‘70s and cultures of masculinity in the sciences. Milam will sign copies of her new book at a reception following her lecture.

Ramesh Srinivasan, an associate professor in the UCLA Information Studies and Design Media Arts departments, will present the McCrady Lecture at 1 p.m., Friday, April 26, in Blackman Auditorium. Srinivasan is the founder of the University of California system-wide Digital Cultures Lab, exploring the meaning of technology worldwide. He will speak on “The Internet of Tomorrow: Stories from Beyond the Valley,” a sneak preview of material from Srinivasan’s upcoming third book, which is built upon research conducted with leading figures in politics, economics, and culture from across the world. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture.

Other events during the week of April 22 related to student scholarship and creative endeavors include the Sewanee Festival of Speaking and Listening, which showcases student speakers engaging in topics of political, legal, social, cultural, and professional significance. More information regarding the Festival may be found here: <https://www.sewanee.edu/resources/center-for-speaking–listening/public-speaking-festival/>. In addition, “Reclamation,” the senior art majors’ exhibition, is on display at the University Art Gallery, and the University Jazz Ensemble will give an end-of-semester concert at 7 p.m., Wednesday, April 24, in St. Luke’s Chapel.